Denmark to End Registration Fee on Merchant Ships

Denmark has proposed to abolish the registration fee on merchant ships, which would remove an obstacle to the growth of vessels flying the Danish flag, Danish Shipping informed.
The government’s new measures for business and industry to prolong the growth of the Danish economy also contain maritime proposals, including the abolition of the special fee on second-hand ships, which are registered in the Danish International Ship Register (DIS).

This proposal would remove a cost which today makes it less attractive for shipping companies to register newly purchased second-hand ships under the Danish flag.

“We know from talks with Danish and foreign shipping companies that the registration fee is an obstacle when they wish to register under Danish flag. Therefore, I am pleased that the fee will be removed as this will make Denmark a more attractive market,” Anne H. Steffensen, CEO of Danish Shipping, said.

“It is a good day for the Danish maritime cluster, and it sends a strong signal that Denmark will be a global maritime power house,” Steffensen added.

When registering a ship in Denmark, a one-time fee of one per thousandth of the value of a ship is charged, as well as a fee for registration of a mortgage, which also represents one per thousandth of the value of the deposit. This applies when a second-hand ship is registered in the Danish International Ship Register, whereas in many competing countries a far lower charge is paid.

“The Danish maritime cluster is growing, so it is also an investment in the future as we can help attract activities to the country,” Brian Mikkelsen, Minister for Industry, Business and Financial Affairs, said.

“Today, it can be three to four times more expensive to register a ship in Denmark than in e.g. Singapore. The better the conditions offered by Denmark, the higher the probability that more ships will fly the Danish flag. I see it as an important matter for the entire shipping industry,” Jan Rindbo, CEO of the shipping company NORDEN, added.